How Does The Sympathizer Not Get An Emmy Nomination?

Thursday, July 18, 2024

 I'm just asking a simple question.

'Cause everyone talked about how 

AMAZING it was.

And it was.

AMAZING that is.

How does it not 

latch on with Emmy voters?

Đụ

That's what I say.

Địt mẹ

At least Reservation Dogs got some.

Finally.


Jenn Tran + First Impression Rose

Monday, July 15, 2024

 


Bachelorette Jenn Tran hands out her First Impression Rose on Night One of 'The Bachelorette' season 21 premiere, 'Week 1.' Watch 'The Bachelorette' 2024 with Jenn Tran MONDAYS 8/7c on ABC. Stream on Hulu.


On The Lack Of Asian Men

Tran said this in a recent Glamour article:

“I can’t really speak to the casting process and the decisions that were made, but it is unfortunate that there weren’t a lot of Asian men this season,” she told Glamour. She was happy to connect with Thomas N. over their shared heritage, and explained why having similar experiences is often a plus for minorities. “It’s not every day that you get to bond with somebody on your immigrant parents and you get to connect with somebody on that level because not everybody can understand that. That was a really special conversation for me because [Thomas] really understood where I was coming from, and my family means everything to me...being a child of immigrant parents is something that not everybody can understand. And so, having that conversation with Thomas N. really meant the world.”

Unbroken Blossoms: Philip W. Chung X Jeff Liu X East West Players: See It While You Still Can

Monday, July 15, 2024

Been hearing great things about this play (written by playwright and former YOMYOMF editor/creative director Phil Chung--and yes Justin Lin did stop by already for one of the nights). 


Here's some info on the play from East West Players which concludes July 21st.

"An idealistic family man and a cynical, aspiring filmmaker are hired as the Chinese American consultants for Broken Blossoms, Hollywood's first onscreen interracial love story... between a white actress and a white actor in yellowface makeup. If the circumstances weren’t already questionable enough, the consultants must contend with the outsized ego of the film's director D.W. Griffith, who is attempting to belie criticisms of racism after the release of his controversial film The Birth of a Nation

Presented by East West Players, Philip W. Chung's play Unbroken Blossoms is a historical reimagining of the making of a boundary-breaking Hollywood classic that shines a light on the collateral damage in the search for "authentic" representation, and asks what price we pay for our art.

Originally presented in 2015 by Visual Communications in partnership with East West Players."

Here's a snippet of a review from the LA Times:

“Unbroken Blossoms” introduces James B. Leong, who went on to write and direct the movie “Lotus Blossom” and act in more than 80 films, and Moon Kwan, who later directed more than 50 films in China while distributing Chinese titles in America. Philip W. Chung, a playwright and the creative director for director Justin Lin’s company YOMYOMF, began writing the piece a decade ago upon learning of the consultants’ existence from the Chinese American film history documentary “Hollywood Chinese.”

“I love movies, and it was mind-blowing to me that there were these people who looked like me in significant roles in the industry back then, because that’s not something you learn when you’re coming up and studying film,” he explained. “The most fascinating thing to me is they both became filmmakers after this movie. Just the idea that someone at that time did that, when it’s still hard to even do that now, was so inspiring.”

Get tickets: https://www.eastwestplayers.org/unbroken


Pork Filled and SIS Productions Team Up to Present Vietgone

Sunday, June 30, 2024

From the PR

Pork Filled Productions and SIS Productions, in association with the Theatre Off Jackson, present Vietgone by Qui Nguyen, directed by Mimi Katano, music direction by YUELAN, August 9th to 24th, at the Theatre Off Jackson (409 7th Ave. S. in Seattle).

         It’s 1975, after the fall of Saigon. Two young survivors (who may or may not be the playwright’s parents) meet in Arkansas. Will this strange land of burritos, bikers, hippies and pot allow them to fall in love? Flipping stereotypes and remixing history, Vietgone cooks up a sexy, funny romp (with live music!) that’s a secret origin story for playwright Qui Nguyen (author of Raya and the Last Dragon)!

         “There’s new interest in the Vietnamese story in America,” says PFP Executive Director Roger Tang. “There’s Viet Thanh Nguyen’s The Sympathizer just on HBO and local artist Susan Lieu ‘s memoir The Manicurist’s Daughter this year. Vietgone kicked off this trend as the first work of art to examine the first generation of Vietnamese coming to this country.

         “Moreover, Qui has been a guiding light for Pork Filled, starting from his Vampire Cowboy days (where he won an Obie). He’s mixed humor and genres like horror, sf, and fantasy; his artistic sensibility permeates all our work. PFP was the first to present his work in the Northwest-it’s natural for us to produce Vietgone.”

          “The rom-com aspect of Vietgone is one that SIS Productions’ audiences will delight in. Our shows center Asian American relationships shared with a sense of humor to inspire people of all races to see Asian Americans through a human, rather than stereotypical lens,” explains Kathy Hsieh, Co-Executive Producer for SIS Productions. “When most people think of the Vietnam War or immigrants and refugees, it's pretty grim and trauma filled. Vietgone playfully flips this, encouraging us to relook at our parents and first-generation refugees through new eyes. They are hip, hot and human. The play inspires us to see our parents for who they really are, rather than through the stereotypes America has created of them.”

         The cast features Wendy Chinn, Joshua Erme, Megan Huynh, Van Lang Pham, and Hank Tian with Adele Lim and Kathy Hsieh as understudies.

         The creative team includes Omar Faust (stage manager), Grecia Leal Pardo (production manager), Robin Macartney (sets), Nick O’Leary (projections), Tianxing Yan (costumes), Jessamyn Bateman-Iino (props), Kassey Castro (sound), Annie Liu (lights), Jasmine Lomax (fight and intimacy), Roger Tang (producer), Kathy Hsieh (producer), Kendall Uyeji (producer), Josh Valdez (producer), David Le (producer) and Alyda Sorm (producer)

         Vietgone plays Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 pm, with matinees on Sundays at 2pm. There is a special matinee Saturday August 17th at 2pm and an Industry Night, Monday, August 19th at 7:30 pm. Also, there is a Relaxed Sensory Performance, August 18th at 2 pm. The show is rated PG-14 for sexual situations, swearing, redneck racism, nightmares of war, and badass kung fu fighting.

         Tickets start at $10 and are available at https://pork-filled.ticketleap.com/vietgone. Tickets for the relaxed sensory performance are at https://pork-filled.ticketleap.com/vietgone-relaxed. PFP is a member of Teen Tix. For more info, email tix@porkfilled.com or go to www.porkfilled.com.

         SIS Productions is a production company that strives to create, develop and produce quality works that involve Asian American women, their themes, and Asian American issues. SIS Productions encourages opportunities and support for Asian American women to be involved in all aspects of the production of artistic endeavors. SIS Productions is supported by 4Culture, ArtsWA and Melvin Inouye.

         The oldest Asian American theatre group in the Pacific Northwest, Pork Filled Productions centers Asian American artists to imagine fantastical, inclusive and FUN universes. Through genres of science fiction, noir, fantasy, steampunk and more, we envision bright universes informed by diverse experiences and perspectives, with larger-than-life characters, where everyone’s story can be told. PFP is supported by 4Culture, ArtsFund, ArtsWA, the National Endowment for the Arts and the Seattle Office of Arts & Culture.

         Pork Filled Productions is fiscally sponsored by Shunpike, the 501(c)(3) non-profit agency that provides independent arts groups in Washington with the services, resources and opportunities they need to forge their own paths to sustainable success.

All The Suni Lee, Asher Hong, Yul Moldauer and Asian Americans For This Year's Olympic Gymnastic Team (Or Hopefuls, Or Who Had Hoped)

Sunday, June 30, 2024

Been doing a lot of writing, photos, and videos for this year's Olympic Gymnastic Teams down at AsAmNews.com that you can check out here:

I'll probably throw out some other posts here and there on experience, other thoughts on AANHPI in regard to the games, access, and other misc. items....



Asian Americans In Houston Thwart Sexual Assault

Thursday, June 20, 2024

Won't Even Start - David Choi - 15 Year Anniversary Acoustic Performance X Back To The Beginning X A Little Kina (Grannis That Is) X Cameo With Retro AJ Rafael?

Wednesday, May 15, 2024


 Original Music Video:

   • David Choi - Won't Even Start - Offic...   Spotify! - http://spoti.fi/2wkCAOE Facebook! -   / davidchoi   Tweet Me! -   / davidchoimusic   Instagram! -   / davidchoimusic   Official! - http://davidchoimusic.com Won't Even Start Lyrics What happened After last summer When we broke up In September I haven't seen you Feels like a long time Sometimes it still hurts But I always get by I still got a piece of you under my skin It's always there no matter where I've been So if I ever see you on the street I'll pretend that I didn't see And turn my face No use in small talk anyways Because if I look into your eyes Then I'll have to say goodbye And that'll break my heart So I won't even start I won't even start I wish you luck And I wish it true That's the best I can do for you 'Cause you'll probably find love In someone new I have to let go Yeah it's hard to do So if I run into you with your arm by his side Just know it'll cut me like a knife So if I ever see you on the street I'll pretend that I didn't see And turn my face No use in small talk anyways Because if I look into your eyes Then I'll have to say goodbye And that'll break my heart So I won't even start I won't even start I'll be ok, I'll be ok Or that's what I'll say So if I ever see you on the street I'll pretend that I didn't see And turn my face No use in small talk anyways 'Cause if I look into your eyes Then I'll have to say goodbye And that'll break my heart So I won't even start Oh I won't even start No I won't even start


Go bAck To The Beginning



And Then Why Not One More



Cameo?




You're A First: Viet-Hanh Winchell

Wednesday, May 15, 2024

From the PIPress


When Viet-Hanh Winchell is sworn in as a judge at the Washington County Courthouse in Stillwater on Monday, she will be making history. Winchell, 41, is believed to be the state’s first Vietnamese-American state court judge. It’s fitting that Winchell will assume her new role this month, which is Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month.


In announcing Winchell’s appointment, Gov. Tim Walz said that she is a “talented litigator whose broad life experiences and commitment to building connections in her community will make her a wonderful addition to the … district.”


[...] Judge Doug Meslow, who has known Winchell for 10 years and will swear her in on Monday morning.

“We are excited that Viet-Hanh is bringing her wisdom and compassion to the bench,” Meslow said. “She’s a well-known and well-respected attorney in Washington County who has represented clients effectively in civil, criminal, juvenile and family cases.”

Lily Tung Crystal To Lead East West Players After Tenure At Theater Mu + Anh Thu T. Pham x Ruthie Johnson

Wednesday, May 15, 2024

Press Release: Mu artistic director Lily Tung Crystal to lead East West Players

Lily Tung Crystal will transition in August to head the nation’s largest Asian American theater company.

(May 15, 2024) Theater Mu announced today that artistic director Lily Tung Crystal will step down from her full-time role at the end of Mu’s 2023/24 season to lead Los Angeles-based East West Players, the longest-running and largest Asian American theater company in the United States. During her tenure, Mu was named a regional cultural treasure by the Ford and McKnight foundations, doubled the size of its staff, and doubled its budget from $650,000 to $1.3 million.

“This is a bittersweet moment because of my deep love for Theater Mu and the Minnesotan theater and Asian American communities. My heart is both happy and breaking,” Tung Crystal says. “I’m grateful to Mu and the Twin Cities for giving me such a significant artistic and spiritual home. My life’s work has centered on the intersection between art and social justice; increasing representation of Asian American and other marginalized artists on stage, TV, and film; and telling more Asian American stories. Mu has allowed me to do that work in a deep and joyful way with a truly incredible group of staff, board, artists, and supporters. I’ve never known a theater so well-loved by its community, and I will miss it terribly.”

She adds, “Yet I look forward to the immense possibilities at East West Players and returning to Los Angeles, where I was born and raised. I hope to continue this work and bring more artistry and equity to theater nationally, in collaboration with artists and organizations across the country, including Theater Mu. I’m humbled and honored to be given the opportunity to lead the nation’s largest Asian American theater company and longest-running theater of color.”

An inclusive artistic vision

Tung Crystal arrived at Mu after co-founding and leading Ferocious Lotus Theatre Company in the Bay Area, and she made a national impact during the COVID-19 pandemic because of her vision for Mu.

Instead of shuttering Theater Mu’s doors like many theaters, she opened them wider, producing at least three virtual events and gathering spaces each week from late March through May 2020. She also directed Susan Soon He Stanton’s Today Is My Birthday, which was produced in February 2021 with support from East West Players, and received national attention for its innovative live-stream coordination.

Other Mu productions she directed were Jihae Park’s peerless (2019), Lauren Yee’s Cambodian Rock Band (2022, co-produced with the Jungle Theater), and the world premiere of Saymoukda Duangphouxay Vongsay’s The Kung Fu Zombies Saga: Shaman Warrior & Cannibals (2023). She most recently directed the world premiere of Blended 和 (Harmony): The Kim Loo Sisters, created by Jessica Huang and Jacinth Greywoode, co-produced with History Theatre, and running now through May 26, 2024.

Overall, Tung Crystal’s artistic programming at Mu emphasized newer works relevant to the vast diaspora of Asian Americans. For instance, during the 2022/23 season, she uniquely programmed an all Southeast Asian season consisting only of world premieres with local playwrights and storytellers. She also championed women, non-binary artists, and theater makers from other marginalized communities.

Managing director Anh Thu T. Pham says, “Lily has made an incredible contribution to Asian American theater and Mu. Her keen artistic eye and values of centering community was something that was evident from her first production here. Her belief in widening our circles ensured that Mu’s mainstage work centered and amplified an intersectional Asian American voice while not losing the artistic excellence that Mu has always been known for. I will miss having her as a colleague, thought-partner, and friend. We look forward to better partnering with East West Players in continuing to move Asian American theater on the national scene. Lily will have a big impact on the theater scene in Los Angeles, and we wish her the absolute best!”

While at Mu, Tung Crystal also acted at Minneapolis theaters and directed an award-winning production of Stephen Karam’s The Humans, featuring a transracial Asian American adoptee family. For her directing work in San Francisco, she was thrice-named a Theatre Bay Area Award finalist for outstanding direction.

Supporting artists at all stages

As Mu’s fourth and first woman artistic director, Tung Crystal prioritized mentorship for and intentional long-term investments in Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) theater artists, particularly those in the local community. Mu’s mainstage productions have become more ambitious each season, but Tung Crystal has made space for emerging artists by revitalizing the Mu Training Institute and establishing Mu’s fellowship program. Other artistic expansions include formalizing the literary committee and supporting Mu’s first three playwright cohorts, two of which were designed by Mu’s Mellon Foundation playwright-in-residence, Duangphouxay Vongsay, and one by literary manager Jane Peña and artistic associate Annie Jin Wang.

“Our goal at Mu is to empower Asian American leaders, center equity, and promote talent, and that statement applies to our own staff and leadership too,” says Theater Mu board chair Ruthie Johnson. “As part of our first female co-director team with managing director Anh Thu T. Pham, Lily has taken Theater Mu to the next level in talent nurturing, production quality, and relevant storytelling, setting up a strong foundation for our next artistic director to build from. We will miss her, but we are also excited to continue to support her and for our partnership with East West Players to grow.”

Tung Crystal will program Theater Mu’s 2024/25 season before her departure. This spring, Mu will name an interim artistic director and then start a nationwide search for her permanent successor. Tung Crystal will stay on as a consultant to help with the transition and onboarding process.

At East West Players, Tung Crystal will become the organization’s fifth artistic director, joining managing director Eugene J. Hutchins.

For interviews, assets, or other media requests, contact Lianna McLernon at lianna@theatermu.org or by calling (612) 709-3324.

Click here to check out Lily Tung Crystal’s personal statement about the announcement, as well as a statement for the Mu community by board chair Ruthie Johnson.

From Mu artistic director Lily Tung Crystal to the community

This is a bittersweet moment because of my deep love for Theater Mu and the Minnesotan theater and Asian American communities. My heart is both happy and breaking. I’m grateful to Mu and the Twin Cities for giving me such a significant artistic and spiritual home and for welcoming me and my family here in 2019. My five years at Mu have been some of my best and most meaningful.  

 My life’s work has centered on the intersection between art and social justice; increasing representation of Asian American and other marginalized artists on stage, TV and film; and telling more Asian American stories. Mu has allowed me to do that work in a deep and joyful way with a truly incredible group of staff, board, artists, and supporters. I’ve never known a theater so well-loved by its community, and I will miss it terribly. 

I’m proud of what we accomplished together, that through a pandemic, rise in anti-Asian violence, and national racial reckoning, Mu took care of its artists, staff, and community. We nurtured the next generation of AAPI and BIPOC theater makers. We lifted up stories from across the Asian American diaspora. We championed the voices of queer and disabled artists, women and non-binary theater makers. We created art together that was impactful and meaningful. 

As such, the decision to go to East West Players is not one I’ve entered into lightly. Organizationally, I hope this move will allow me to connect Mu and East West Players so that we can effect change and champion Asian American stories across the country. And personally, I look forward to returning to the city where I was born and raised, where my father is buried, and to the state where most of my extended family resides.

At East West Players, I hope to bring more artistry and equity to theater nationally, in collaboration with other artists and organizations, including Theater Mu. I’m humbled and honored to be given the opportunity to lead the nation’s largest Asian American theater company and longest-running theater of color.

I am privileged to be leaving Mu with the full support of its treasured staff and board. Mu’s legacy and mission is much larger than one individual, and I am confident in my co-leader and managing director Anh Thu T. Pham and the Mu staff and artists to move forward with love, empathy, and strength. 

It has been a true honor to lead this organization. Thank you for inviting me in and supporting me and Mu. I look forward to seeing what the future brings for this company that I love so dearly.

From managing director Anh Thu T. Pham

Lily has made an incredible contribution to Asian American theater and Mu. Her keen artistic eye and values of centering community was something that was evident from her first production here. Her belief in widening our circles ensured that Mu’s mainstage work centered and amplified an intersectional Asian American voice while not losing the artistic excellence that Mu has always been known for. I will miss having her as a colleague, thought-partner, and friend. We look forward to better partnering with East West Players in continuing to move Asian American theater in the national scene. Lily will have a big impact on the theater scene in Los Angeles, and we wish her the absolute best!


From board chair Ruthie Johnson

We are grateful for the work Lily has done in the last four years to help identify new playwrights, expand the breadth of Asian storytelling, and showcase our beautiful, diverse Asian community in Minnesota. While we will miss her, we are excited to build on this foundation, keeping our values of equity, justice, and storytelling at the forefront as we begin our search for a new artistic director. We would like to thank our Mu staff, artists, community, donors, and board for their ongoing support and partnership as we navigate this transition

More Crooning. More Laufey. And Art

Friday, May 10, 2024


Hit the linkbelow because it cannot be embedded: 


Nice work if you can get it.

The Gen Z Crooner For The Anxious Generation.

Dope.

 

17 Asian American Film Festivals

Wednesday, May 01, 2024

 


  1. DC Asian Pacific American Film Festival - Focuses on promoting AANHPI artistic development, representation, and community building. The festival has been running for over 20 years and takes place in Washington, D.C. Visit the festival page

  2. DisOrient Asian American Film Festival of Oregon - This festival celebrates independent films that offer authentic AANHPI voices and stories, highlighting social justice themes. It is held annually in Oregon. Learn more about DisOrient

  3. CAAMFest - Formerly the San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival, CAAMFest is one of the largest festivals of its kind in the US, showcasing Asian American and Asian film, music, and food. Explore CAAMFest

  4. Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival - This festival presents films and media that reflect the lives and experiences of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Visit the festival site

  5. Seattle Asian American Film Festival - Held annually in Seattle, this festival showcases films by and about Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Check out Seattle AAF

  6. Philadelphia Asian American Film Festival - Celebrates and elevates the Asian American experience through cinema, providing a cultural representation across a broad spectrum of media. More on PAAFF

  7. San Francisco International South Asian Film Festival - Presents films from South Asia and its diaspora. Known for showcasing compelling and innovative narratives. Learn more

  8. Vancouver Asian Film Festival - One of the oldest Asian film festivals in Canada, it promotes the appreciation of Asian cinema. Visit VAFF

  9. Toronto Reel Asian Film Festival - This Canadian festival showcases a wide variety of Asian cinema, including East, South, and Southeast Asian films. Explore Reel Asian

  10. Boston Asian American Film Festival - Empowers Asian Americans through film by showcasing Asian American experiences and serving as a resource to filmmakers and the Greater Boston community. More on BAAFF

  11. San Diego Asian Film Festival - One of the largest exhibitions of Asian cinema in North America. Hosted by Pacific Arts Movement, it features both Asian and Asian American films. Visit SDAFF

  12. Viet Film Fest - Showcases the best in Vietnamese cinema and provides a platform for Vietnamese voices in film. Held in Orange County, home to the largest Vietnamese population outside Vietnam. Learn more

  13. Korean American Film Festival New York (KAFFNY) - Dedicated to presenting stories by Korean and Korean American filmmakers. Explore KAFFNY

  14. Asian American Showcase - Hosted by the Foundation for Asian American Independent Media (FAAIM) in Chicago, focuses on celebrating Asian American artistic achievements. Check it out

  15. Sacramento Asian Pacific Film Festival - Aims to foster understanding of the experiences of Asian Pacific Islanders through films curated from around the globe. More on SAPFF

  16. Asian Film Festival of Dallas - Celebrates Asian and Asian American culture by screening films annually from Asia and the Asian diaspora. Visit AFFD

  17. Hawaii International Film Festival - Known for its unique blend of Asian, Pacific, and Hawaiian cinema, HIFF offers a rich variety of films from around the world, held in Honolulu. Visit HIFF

It's Our Month + I Had AI Create Posters With Asian American Heritage Month

Wednesday, May 01, 2024



Hip Hip Hooray It's Our Month!

When I typed in "Asian American Heritage Month" to create a poster in Adobe Express the above was what it gave me. 

Hmmmmm....

Woohooo! It's Our Month!

Get Naked! Run around the block! Because it's our month!

David Mura x Guggenheim Fellow

Tuesday, April 30, 2024

A post and congratulations to David Mura who was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship earlier this month. David Mura has been at the center of so much in the Asian American community and it's great to see him continue to push new ideas and thoughts about race and culture into mainstream narratives, and to be recognized for that work.

For the fellowship here's what he said via an MPR news article:

[Mura said that he plans to create a new memoir inspired, in part, by his parents, who were interned during World War II.]

“Both my parents passed in the last two years, and all of their generation of second-generation Japanese Americans have passed in the last few years. So as the oldest in the extended family in the one writer, I feel like I'm a vessel and a voice for our whole family history.”

Read it in full here: https://www.mprnews.org/story/2024/04/11/three-minnesotans-announced-as-guggenheim-fellows

WWW @ https://davidmura.com/


Theater Mu + BLENDED 和(HARMONY): THE KIM LOO SISTERS

Tuesday, April 30, 2024

 


book & lyrics by JESSICA HUANG
music by JACINTH GREYWOODE
directed by LILY TUNG CRYSTAL

May 4 - 26, 2024
co-produced with HISTORY THEATRE

Get More Info At https://www.theatermu.org/blended-harmony